There are also matches in the number. For example: Vitabu viwili vitatosha (Two books will be enough), Michungwa miwili itatosha (Two orange trees will be enough), Machungwa mawili yatatosha (Two oranges will be enough). 4. When sentences begin with “there” or “here”, the subject is always placed according to the verb. He must show a little care to properly identify each piece. For example, in Standard English, we can say that I am or that he is, but not “I am” or “he is”. This is because the grammar of language requires that the verb and its subject correspond personally. The pronouns I and him are the first or third person respectively, just as the verb forms are and are. The verb must be chosen in such a way as to have the same person as the subject, unlike the fictitious agreement based on meaning.

[2] [3] For example, in American English, the un expression is treated as a singular for the purposes of the agreement, although it is formally plural. You will find other sentences that show the correct correspondence between the subject and the verb in examples of subject-verb agreement. You can also download our shorter top 10 rule infographic and keep it handy. The structure of it exists or exists is very simple: rule 6. In sentences that begin with here or there, the real subject follows the verb. So which of these sentences is correct? The answer is both. The first follows the default rule. But the second is also accepted, and many authors would prefer it because it seems more natural. If the subject is present or gives according to a list of items, you can match your verb to the first noun in the list. Here are some special cases for subject-verb correspondence in English: “She brought back another woman wearing a similar uniform, except that she was pink in white. This woman`s hair was gathered in a pile of curls on the back of her head; Some of the loops were fake. ” – The warrior: memoirs of a girl between spirits.

Alfred A. Knopf, 1976 In early Modern English existed the agreement for the second person singular of all verbs in the present tense, as well as in the past form of some common verbs. It was normally in the form -est, but -st and -t also occurred.. . .